Tabernacle

“I was baptised in the Tabernacl in 1996, my great x4 Grandfather Richard Hughes was a deacon and the treasurer at Tabernacl. Richard Hughes hid the money from tabernacl under a grate in the floor in his house for safe keeping. Parch Idwal Jones baptised me. Eluned Jones was the treasurer and being our distant cousin, she arranged it all with Parch Idwal Jones. It was a full submersion and I signed a register then we went to hotel on the front afterwards for a meal. There were a few words of English spoken at my baptism unusual to hear English there Parch Idwal said “it was because there were visitors from the Wirral (my family)”. Mark Hughes
Deacons and Trustees, Tabernacl, permission Conwy County Archives
Deacons and Trustees, Tabernacl, permission Conwy County Archives
I have been told that during WW1 members of the clergy including most likely the Tabernacl went up the Great Orme, to where the men were playing football and told them if they were fit enough to play football, they were fit enough to fight – of course by the time WW2 happened the clergy distanced themselves from the carnage of WW1. “ Adrian Hughes.
Site of original Tabernacl seen from Orme, permission Conwy County archives
Site of original Tabernacl seen from Orme, permission Conwy County archives
“ I rented the annexe from the trustees as an art gallery .The organ is spectacular, people would travel weekly to come and play it ,an organist from Chester came frequently to play. Apparently one organ builder says he thinks it maybe late 1700’s early 1800’s due to the arsenic marking on the pipes’. Opera singers just came in to practise because of the acoustics and sound chamber qualities of the place. Of course there were the baptism gown with stones from the beach in their hems to weight them down and the deacon’s boots that he wore during baptisms because he didn’t like to get wet of course.” Phillip Garbutt
“My name is Delyth, I remember the annual Sunday school trip to Llandudno by steam train from Blaenau Ffestiniog during the. Late 1940/50ies. We would go to the Capel Tabernacle for lunch. The ladies of the chapel would have made us a lovely lunch with ‘puddings’ which was a great treat for us. We were from Tabernacle Chapel in Blaenau Ffestiniog and for weeks before the Sunday School trip we made sure we went to Sunday School otherwise we wouldn’t be allowed to go on the trip. The times we would count our pennies saved, even on the train. Going through the long tunnel we would be looking through the train windows trying to see the tramps that our mothers told us were there banging their food tins. Hope it helps you” Delyth Shotter
Lewis Valentine, Tabernacl, permission Conwy County Archives
Lewis Valentine, Tabernacl, permission Conwy County Archives
“I like to believe that the Imperial typewriter still in the vestry is the very one that Valentine used to write his sermons and ‘Y Derynas’ on – why not? It probably was, we could date it and find out” Robert Barnsdale
“Our family had a lot of contact with the Tabernacl in the past – I have only recently discovered this – also my Dad’s funeral service was held there in 1984.”  Angela Nutall
“The kitchen is very familiar to me as it came from our house, all the cabinets and work tops. “ Christopher Griffifths, deacon and former trustee of Tabernacl.
“ There are so many plaques from all the Chapels in Llandudno that are round and about, homeless it would be lovely to see them installed on the walls for all to see in the schoolroom in Tabernacl.” Robert Barnsdale
“Much of the Tabernacl furniture was made by a Richard William Jones, a carpenter and treasurer of the chapel. His daughter Eluned Jones, former secretary is still alive today at a Llandudno Nursing Home. His stamp can be seen on the remaining pieces at the front of the pulpit.”        Christopher Griffiths
Tabernacl, Upper Mostyn Street, permission Conwy County Archives
Tabernacl, Upper Mostyn Street, permission Conwy County Archives
“The changing of the light bulbs in the main chapel was a job. One of us had to go onto the gallery climb through the attic hatch and then lower down the ever so long flex to someone standing on the pulpit so they could screw in the bulb, then two tugs and he would pull it back up and scramble through the roof space again.”  Christopher Griffiths
Congregation and Sunday School, Tabernacl, permission Conwy County Archives
Congregation and Sunday School, Tabernacl, permission Conwy County Archives

This post is also available in: Welsh

26, Augusta Street, Tedder House exterior, RAFA opening ceremony, photographic credit, John Lawson – Raey